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photo unter CC-BY licence.

There is no planet B!


Make the world #GRETA again!
Everyone of you can be a little #GRETA!
Don’t stop fighting for our favorite planet!

March 15 - Just make a sign and go protest!


https://fridaysforfuture.org
#fridaysForFuture #Protest #SchoolStrike #Students #Climate #ClimateChange #Politics #Demo #GretThunberg #environment #resistance #school #youth


 
Attention: English, German and Dutch below.

The current mood in the Netherlands allows for analysis like this one by Caroline de Gruyter. The original was published in a major Dutch newspaper (NRC) and it shows, I believe, how more and more Europeans prefer to deal with the situation, after the struggle during the past two years. I am feeling very sorry for the many UK citizens that want to remain, but I fear their message is hidden below an avalanche of negative comments and fake facts by their representatives during the past years.
The point Caroline is making, is that a large part of the English population have never embraced the ideas behind the EU, it's raison d'être, but wanted to be part of it for their own economic interests.

The fact that the article has been translated into English and German, to serve international audiences, shows that she has touched on an emotion that is not limited to The Netherlands but is shared by some of the population in the EU.
See the article below in a language of your choice.

Auf Deutsch:
Die aktuelle Stimmung in den Niederlanden erlaubt eine Analyse wie diese von Caroline de Gruyter. Das Original wurde in einer großen niederländischen Zeitung (NRC) veröffentlicht, und es zeigt, glaube ich, wie immer mehr Europäer es vorziehen, mit der Situation nach dem Kampf in den letzten zwei Jahren umzugehen. Es tut mir sehr leid für die vielen britischen Bürger, die bleiben wollen, aber ich fürchte, ihre Botschaft verbirgt sich hinter einer Lawine von negativen Kommentaren und gefälschten Fakten, die ihre Vertreter in den letzten Jahren gemacht haben.
Der Punkt, den Caroline anführt, ist, dass ein großer Teil der englischen Bevölkerung die Ideen hinter der EU, ihrer Daseinsberechtigung, noch nie angenommen hat, aber aus eigenen wirtschaftlichen Interessen daran teilhaben wollte.

Die Tatsache, dass der Artikel ins Englische und Deutsche übersetzt wurde, um dem internationalen Publikum zu dienen, zeigt, dass sie eine Emotion angesprochen hat, die nicht auf die Niederlande beschränkt ist, sondern von einem Teil der Bevölkerung in der EU geteilt wird.
(Übersetzt mit www.DeepL.com/Translator)

Caroline de Gruyter on #Brexit in English.
Caroline de Gruyter auf Deutsch.
Original article in Dutch.

#Brexit #politics #EU #Caroline-de-Gruyter #NRC


 
Attention: English, German and Dutch below.

The current mood in the Netherlands allows for analysis like this one by Caroline de Gruyter. The original was published in a major Dutch newspaper (NRC) and it shows, I believe, how more and more Europeans prefer to deal with the situation, after the struggle during the past two years. I am feeling very sorry for the many UK citizens that want to remain, but I fear their message is hidden below an avalanche of negative comments and fake facts by their representatives during the past years.
The point Caroline is making, is that a large part of the English population have never embraced the ideas behind the EU, it's raison d'être, but wanted to be part of it for their own economic interests.

The fact that the article has been translated into English and German, to serve international audiences, shows that she has touched on an emotion that is not limited to The Netherlands but is shared by some of the population in the EU.
See the article below in a language of your choice.

Auf Deutsch:
Die aktuelle Stimmung in den Niederlanden erlaubt eine Analyse wie diese von Caroline de Gruyter. Das Original wurde in einer großen niederländischen Zeitung (NRC) veröffentlicht, und es zeigt, glaube ich, wie immer mehr Europäer es vorziehen, mit der Situation nach dem Kampf in den letzten zwei Jahren umzugehen. Es tut mir sehr leid für die vielen britischen Bürger, die bleiben wollen, aber ich fürchte, ihre Botschaft verbirgt sich hinter einer Lawine von negativen Kommentaren und gefälschten Fakten, die ihre Vertreter in den letzten Jahren gemacht haben.
Der Punkt, den Caroline anführt, ist, dass ein großer Teil der englischen Bevölkerung die Ideen hinter der EU, ihrer Daseinsberechtigung, noch nie angenommen hat, aber aus eigenen wirtschaftlichen Interessen daran teilhaben wollte.

Die Tatsache, dass der Artikel ins Englische und Deutsche übersetzt wurde, um dem internationalen Publikum zu dienen, zeigt, dass sie eine Emotion angesprochen hat, die nicht auf die Niederlande beschränkt ist, sondern von einem Teil der Bevölkerung in der EU geteilt wird.
(Übersetzt mit www.DeepL.com/Translator)

Caroline de Gruyter on #Brexit in English.
Caroline de Gruyter auf Deutsch.
Original article in Dutch.

#Brexit #politics #EU #Caroline-de-Gruyter #NRC


 

State Department bars press corps from Pompeo briefing unless they work for “faith-based media,” won't release list of attendees or transcript

The afternoon phone briefing was to discuss international freedom with the secretary -- who rarely participates in such calls -- to discuss "international religious freedom" ahead of his trip to the Middle East. One member of the State Department press corps was invited, only to be un-invited after RSVPing. That reporter was told that the call was for "faith-based media only."

Despite repeated inquires and complaints from members of the press corps who are based at the department, the State Department on Monday night said they would not be providing a transcript of the call, a list of faith-based media outlets who were allowed to participate or the criteria to be invited.

Officials would not answer questions about whether a range of faiths was included.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/18/politics/state-department-faith-outlets-briefing/index.html
#news #politics #currentevents #religion


 

State Department bars press corps from Pompeo briefing unless they work for “faith-based media,” won't release list of attendees or transcript

The afternoon phone briefing was to discuss international freedom with the secretary -- who rarely participates in such calls -- to discuss "international religious freedom" ahead of his trip to the Middle East. One member of the State Department press corps was invited, only to be un-invited after RSVPing. That reporter was told that the call was for "faith-based media only."

Despite repeated inquires and complaints from members of the press corps who are based at the department, the State Department on Monday night said they would not be providing a transcript of the call, a list of faith-based media outlets who were allowed to participate or the criteria to be invited.

Officials would not answer questions about whether a range of faiths was included.
https://www.cnn.com/2019/03/18/politics/state-department-faith-outlets-briefing/index.html
#news #politics #currentevents #religion


 
#Politics


 
#Politics


 
28 cakes later - the only #brexit countdown that matters
https://twitter.com/JamesHarrisNow/status/1101419877640884224
To mark 29 days to Brexit I have decided to post a picture of 28 European cakes, one for each EU member state.
https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1101419877640884224.html

#politics #brexit #eu


 
Hi everyone! My name is Elise and I'm #newhere

I'm interested in #politics and #news and would describe myself as a #progressive. I am a big fan of #sports, #movies and shows on #netflix, #hulu and #amazon. I just watched #the-marvelous-mrs-maisel and am currently watching #Brooklyn-99. I also like #TheOffice #ParksandRecreation and #GameOfThrones. I am also an appreciator of #art and #music of many different kinds. I love #baking and #reading as well but don't have a lot of time to do it for fun. I also study #French and am a lover of all things from #France!


 
Today the Spanish Supreme court trials begin against 12 Catalan political leaders for:

* allowing a debate in parliament
* defending a vote on independence
* organising peaceful demonstrations

They each face potentially 25 years in prison. These *innocent* people have already been held in prison for up to 14 months.

In Europe. In 2019.

#Catalonia #Catalunya #politics #democracy


 
Copyright Reform: Article 13 will be the end for alternative social media


#freedom #saveyourinternet #Piraten #pirates #politics #europeanunion #Article13 #Diaspora #Mastodon #Friendica #Fediverse


 
Well, after the picture we saw yesterday of #May and #Juncker, today we have this picture of May and #Tusk.

Judging from both pictures and the body language, the relationship between the #UK and the #EU has severely been damaged by the political hassle in the UK and the "again and again returning for more favours". It will probably take a political shift in the UK before we can even think about beginning to mend the relationship. It is clear from the body language that the EU and the UK are a long way from calling each other friends.

This is bad, because the EU and the UK will have to negotiate trade deals after #Brexit. If relations are bad, negotiating treaties will be difficult and solely based on economic interests. There probably is little motivation on both sides to consider each other's needs, hence every compromise will be more of a battle, just like what we have seen the past two years.
If there is a lack of willingness to compromise, negotiations will drag on forever.

Who was that, that said negotiating a deal would be easy?

#politics #trade #treaty #negotiation #deal


 
Well, after the picture we saw yesterday of #May and #Juncker, today we have this picture of May and #Tusk.

Judging from both pictures and the body language, the relationship between the #UK and the #EU has severely been damaged by the political hassle in the UK and the "again and again returning for more favours". It will probably take a political shift in the UK before we can even think about beginning to mend the relationship. It is clear from the body language that the EU and the UK are a long way from calling each other friends.

This is bad, because the EU and the UK will have to negotiate trade deals after #Brexit. If relations are bad, negotiating treaties will be difficult and solely based on economic interests. There probably is little motivation on both sides to consider each other's needs, hence every compromise will be more of a battle, just like what we have seen the past two years.
If there is a lack of willingness to compromise, negotiations will drag on forever.

Who was that, that said negotiating a deal would be easy?

#politics #trade #treaty #negotiation #deal


 
8 February: possible export problems. From this week, freighters setting sail from UK ports with cargo for far-flung destinations such as Australia and New Zealand, a journey of about 50 days, risk arriving after Brexit day with - in the event of a no-deal Brexit – no idea of the trade rules that will be in place.

14 February: Brexit debate in the Commons. This is most likely to be a general debate following a prime ministerial statement, because Theresa May will almost certainly not have a revised deal by then. But amendments to the motion could lead to “indicative votes” on Brexit options or an extension of the two-year article 50 process, possibly via a relaunched Yvette Cooper-Nick Boles amendment setting a deadline for MPs to back the agreement.

14 February: first statutory instrument deadline. According to the Institute for Government, this is the final day on which about half the secondary legislation needed to import EU laws can be introduced, because parliament must be given 40 sitting days to object to it. EU-related SIs can be passed more quickly in “urgent circumstances”, but still need to be approved by both houses within a 28-day window.

17 February: more trade woes. From this date, ships setting sail for Japan from the UK and vice versa could arrive to find themselves in the middle of no-deal tariff mayhem.

20 February: international treaty ratification deadline. About 80 of roughly 100 international treaties with other countries remain to be ratified by parliament, a process that – barring “exceptional cases” – requires 21 sitting days.

28 February: self-imposed deadline agreed by May and the European Commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, to discuss progress made by the two sides towards a revised deal the prime minister can bring back to the Commons.

Early-mid March: second “meaningful vote”. The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 obliges the British parliament to hold a vote on the withdrawal agreement before the European Parliament has its say.

21-22 March: article 50 extension request? With barely a week to go before Brexit day, EU leaders gather for their annual spring summit. This is when some EU officials think the UK might ask for more time to conclude Brexit by requesting an extension to article 50. This would need to be agreed unanimously by the EU27 and there is no time limit for it to do so – it could happen very late.

By 28 March: UK ratification of extension? If Britain has asked for an extension and the EU27 has granted it, both houses of parliament must vote to allow the legally binding exit date of 29 March to be changed.

Mid-late March: UK ratification of a deal. If MPs eventually back May’s deal without an article 50 extension, the government still has to get the bill through both houses. Primary legislation of this sort can be rushed through quickly, perhaps with controversial elements stripped out. But an avalanche of amendments could still make the 29 March departure date unattainable.
**
25-28 March:** EU ratification. If there has been no extension, the European parliament’s second Strasbourg meeting would be the last chance for MEPs to vote through the withdrawal agreement to get it agreed before Brexit day. EU ambassadors would then have a few dozen hours to rubber-stamp the final deal.
**
29 March:** Brexit day? Without an extension, the UK will formally leave the EU on 29 March at 11 pm UK time (midnight in Brussels). EU officials think a last-minute plea for more time by the UK would be unlikely, as, by this late hour, events would have their own momentum. Equally unlikely, they believe, is the possibility of Britain cancelling Brexit – although the European court of justice set no notice period when it ruled the UK could unilaterally revoke article 50, so, in theory, the government could still make a U-turn even at this stage.

15-18 April: EU ratification following an extension. If the UK has been granted a short technical extension to complete the Brexit process, MEPs’ monthly plenary meeting in Strasbourg would be the final opportunity for the European Parliament to ratify the agreement before European elections.

23-26 May: European elections. If the UK sought and obtained an extension to article 50 that went beyond 2 July – the first day of the new parliament – it would have to take part in those elections, EU officials have said.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/feb/08/countdown-to-brexit-key-dates-uk-eu-exit-approaches

#brexit #sillymonkeys #politics


 
8 February: possible export problems. From this week, freighters setting sail from UK ports with cargo for far-flung destinations such as Australia and New Zealand, a journey of about 50 days, risk arriving after Brexit day with - in the event of a no-deal Brexit – no idea of the trade rules that will be in place.

14 February: Brexit debate in the Commons. This is most likely to be a general debate following a prime ministerial statement, because Theresa May will almost certainly not have a revised deal by then. But amendments to the motion could lead to “indicative votes” on Brexit options or an extension of the two-year article 50 process, possibly via a relaunched Yvette Cooper-Nick Boles amendment setting a deadline for MPs to back the agreement.

14 February: first statutory instrument deadline. According to the Institute for Government, this is the final day on which about half the secondary legislation needed to import EU laws can be introduced, because parliament must be given 40 sitting days to object to it. EU-related SIs can be passed more quickly in “urgent circumstances”, but still need to be approved by both houses within a 28-day window.

17 February: more trade woes. From this date, ships setting sail for Japan from the UK and vice versa could arrive to find themselves in the middle of no-deal tariff mayhem.

20 February: international treaty ratification deadline. About 80 of roughly 100 international treaties with other countries remain to be ratified by parliament, a process that – barring “exceptional cases” – requires 21 sitting days.

28 February: self-imposed deadline agreed by May and the European Commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, to discuss progress made by the two sides towards a revised deal the prime minister can bring back to the Commons.

Early-mid March: second “meaningful vote”. The European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018 obliges the British parliament to hold a vote on the withdrawal agreement before the European Parliament has its say.

21-22 March: article 50 extension request? With barely a week to go before Brexit day, EU leaders gather for their annual spring summit. This is when some EU officials think the UK might ask for more time to conclude Brexit by requesting an extension to article 50. This would need to be agreed unanimously by the EU27 and there is no time limit for it to do so – it could happen very late.

By 28 March: UK ratification of extension? If Britain has asked for an extension and the EU27 has granted it, both houses of parliament must vote to allow the legally binding exit date of 29 March to be changed.

Mid-late March: UK ratification of a deal. If MPs eventually back May’s deal without an article 50 extension, the government still has to get the bill through both houses. Primary legislation of this sort can be rushed through quickly, perhaps with controversial elements stripped out. But an avalanche of amendments could still make the 29 March departure date unattainable.
**
25-28 March:** EU ratification. If there has been no extension, the European parliament’s second Strasbourg meeting would be the last chance for MEPs to vote through the withdrawal agreement to get it agreed before Brexit day. EU ambassadors would then have a few dozen hours to rubber-stamp the final deal.
**
29 March:** Brexit day? Without an extension, the UK will formally leave the EU on 29 March at 11 pm UK time (midnight in Brussels). EU officials think a last-minute plea for more time by the UK would be unlikely, as, by this late hour, events would have their own momentum. Equally unlikely, they believe, is the possibility of Britain cancelling Brexit – although the European court of justice set no notice period when it ruled the UK could unilaterally revoke article 50, so, in theory, the government could still make a U-turn even at this stage.

15-18 April: EU ratification following an extension. If the UK has been granted a short technical extension to complete the Brexit process, MEPs’ monthly plenary meeting in Strasbourg would be the final opportunity for the European Parliament to ratify the agreement before European elections.

23-26 May: European elections. If the UK sought and obtained an extension to article 50 that went beyond 2 July – the first day of the new parliament – it would have to take part in those elections, EU officials have said.

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2019/feb/08/countdown-to-brexit-key-dates-uk-eu-exit-approaches

#brexit #sillymonkeys #politics


 
So... the elected government of the UK negotiates a deal with the EU. Now the rest of the parliament doesn't like the outcome and now the EU should accept some new terms without getting anything out of it. Did I get this right? #politics #brexit


 
Hello everyone i'm #newhere. Thanks to all those who found me here. I appreciate you. I was feeling lonely <3

I love to read about #archeology #science #humanist
#Astrology #atheism #ecology #economy #politics


 
Hello everyone i'm #newhere. Thanks to all those who found me here. I appreciate you. I was feeling lonely <3

I love to read about #archeology #science #humanist
#Astrology #atheism #ecology #economy #politics


 
“Google leadership is not operating in good faith.”

Google Urged the U.S. to Limit Protection for Activist Workers


While Google publicly supported employees who protested company policies, it quietly asked the government to narrow the right to organize over work email.
"It demonstrates that Google leadership is not operating in good faith,” said McMillen. “They can have a town hall and try to say soothing words and get people to not want to quit, but then if in the background they’re not just rejecting carrying out most of the demands of the walkout, but also trying to tamp down our ability to even coordinate and talk to each other about these issues, that’s extremely concerning.”

“In an email to all of Google, Sundar assured us that he and Google’s leadership supported the walkout. But the company’s requests to the National Labor Relations Board tell a different story,” organizers of the employee walkout wrote in a statement. “If these protections are rolled back, Google will be complicit in limiting the rights of working people across the United States, not just us.” They asked not to be named for fear of retaliation.

Google employees have captured international attention in recent months through high-profile protests of workplace policies.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-01-24/google-urged-the-u-s-to-limit-protection-for-activist-workers
#google #news #politics #work #currentevents #technology


 
“Google leadership is not operating in good faith.”

Google Urged the U.S. to Limit Protection for Activist Workers


While Google publicly supported employees who protested company policies, it quietly asked the government to narrow the right to organize over work email.
"It demonstrates that Google leadership is not operating in good faith,” said McMillen. “They can have a town hall and try to say soothing words and get people to not want to quit, but then if in the background they’re not just rejecting carrying out most of the demands of the walkout, but also trying to tamp down our ability to even coordinate and talk to each other about these issues, that’s extremely concerning.”

“In an email to all of Google, Sundar assured us that he and Google’s leadership supported the walkout. But the company’s requests to the National Labor Relations Board tell a different story,” organizers of the employee walkout wrote in a statement. “If these protections are rolled back, Google will be complicit in limiting the rights of working people across the United States, not just us.” They asked not to be named for fear of retaliation.

Google employees have captured international attention in recent months through high-profile protests of workplace policies.
https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-01-24/google-urged-the-u-s-to-limit-protection-for-activist-workers
#google #news #politics #work #currentevents #technology


 
Omg that Pelosi letter. 🔥🔥🔥

He’ll need to explained to him a few times before he understands she just whacked him with a cast iron pan, though. So no rage tweeting till, what, 3 am?

https://twitter.com/nycsouthpaw/status/1085546417425403904

#news #politics


 
Omg that Pelosi letter. 🔥🔥🔥

He’ll need to explained to him a few times before he understands she just whacked him with a cast iron pan, though. So no rage tweeting till, what, 3 am?

https://twitter.com/nycsouthpaw/status/1085546417425403904

#news #politics


 
Elections have consequences 🙂
https://twitter.com/GovLauraKelly/status/1085229733942644737?s=19
#news #currentevents #politics

Twitter: @GovLauraKelly on Twitter (@GovLauraKelly)


 
Elections have consequences 🙂
https://twitter.com/GovLauraKelly/status/1085229733942644737?s=19
#news #currentevents #politics

Twitter: @GovLauraKelly on Twitter (@GovLauraKelly)


 
Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates - The Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/2018/12/12/workers-are-ghosting-their-employers-like-bad-dates/

Hire and fire works both ways. Employers find that disturbing.

#politics #work #laborlaw


 
Or to put it more bluntly: why we shouldn't give in to thugs (and the politicians and journalists who legitimise them):
#brexit #UK #EU #politics #protest #thugs


 
Or to put it more bluntly: why we shouldn't give in to thugs (and the politicians and journalists who legitimise them):
#brexit #UK #EU #politics #protest #thugs


 
You'll be familiar with the old meme, now updated for Brexit:

"...and if you believe that, I have a ferry service to sell you."

#Brexit #politics #UK #bridge #Seaborne


 
Laut ORF heißt der Parlamentsklub der Liste Pilz ab jetzt "Jetzt". Ich glaube, da hat sich ein Redakteur folgende Meldung verkneifen müssen:

"Jetzt gab bekannt, dass Jetzt jetzt Jetzt heißt."

Und wann wird die Zukunft zu jetzt? Schon bald…

#austria #politics #idonteven


 

The EU Copyright Reform - 3 days left to take action


by @CrocoDuck (shared with permission from the author)
Before we dig in, the EU copyright reform will be discussed by the Europarliament on the 20 June 2018. The parliament is split in half: few MEPs could be enough to reject Article 11 and 13. Take action! I mean, if you agree Article 11 and 13 are bad... (Scroll to the end of the post for useful links.)
We have talked at length of Article 11 and , especially, Article 13, which would de-facto mandate the use of content filtering on a vast array of online services [1]. Let's just assume for a second that Article 13 will become reality. Could that mean that, in order to assist many online service providers to stay on business, few corporations could step in and offer content filtering services? The eventual rise of companies providing content filters is a double edged sword. The reason is that by controlling them then contents are controlled. We seen very well how social networks are already factoring in into shaping public opinions and informing voting decisions. Hence, there is a real bad risk in having businesses involved in filtering contents for a profit. The only way this could work would be if they were mandated to be Open Source, and with regular audit, peer reviewed, their performance constantly assessed: the filters operation must be public. Even then, I would really prefer nothing like this existing.

Since censorship machines are complex Machine Learning systems that need extensive investments and research to work at all, never mind properly, the proposal was revisited to exempt non-profit organizations. When exceptions are needed for a law to work properly (i.e. do not kill non-profits or small business) it means that it isn’t written properly. Not to mention, mandating content filtering would essentially mean gifting the entire market to giant corporations which either already have them or can afford to develop them. Something like this goes in the direction of monopoly, which is not really a good direction. Even worse, few countries (France, Italy, Spain and Portugal) are pushing to have content filtering mandatory for every platform, also non-profit ones [2].

Moreover, the proposed exceptions are not that good either. Every platform which is not a non-profit platform on which copyright protected material is uploaded would have to abide to Article 13. Among these platforms we can list: GitHub, GitLab, Launchpad, BitBucket… Open Source software development could be slowed down very significantly by false positives of filters in this regard, as complex nesting of many open source project with different licenses and copyright holders can be very very tricky to filter automatically. This isn’t realistic [3].

On the topic of Open Source: the industry relies on Open Source. Just think about every single scientific experiment running simulations and data processing on Linux clusters, or the fact that all respected machine learning toolboxes are Open Source. Blocking, or slowing down, Open Source means blocking (or slowing down) EU scientific and engineering innovation [5]. We could say that collaborative development might be safe in itself, as version control systems (git, svn, ...) can be self hosted. But this means going back in history of more than 10 years, when developers did not get to know the ecosystem of OSS software well and had quite a significant proportion of their everyday life essentially wasted in maintaining their own servers and manually managing projects. Whilst GitPub [4] could be a solution, we really don’t know if it is a solution good enough to justify a mass transition. Likely, whatever the solution will be, it will have a years long transition time. In the current situation, services like GitHub and the like are essentially allowing developers to take care of the code only, be easily in touch and cooperate seamlessly. A system of individually maintained repos could be a regression with huge productivity drop that will only be compensated for once a federated system can provide the same (if not more) of the advantages of GitHub style services. All of this assuming that there will be the political will to exempt the federated services for real: as a reminder we know that few EU countries would be totally happy to have federated systems not exempted. Finally, I don’t think that, even if workaround exists, we should accept a law which isn’t right or well written or both. Accepting every step backwards might lead us to the day in which we will have to do these things on the dark web. For me, it will be as absurd as going to buy sliced bread during night, dressed as a ninja, covered by the dark, passing only in the side alleys. It would make no sense.

Not to mention, this law has also very little balance: too much power in the hands of who would claim copyright infringement. A good law has to introduce balance. Something like Article 13 cannot be introduced without an effective system for people to defend themselves against unlawful claims, and without a strong system of punishment against unlawful claims. We all seen how utterly rubbish YouTube has been on this in the past. This almost feels like mandating YouTube filters worst mechanics.

There is one last detail: link tax regulation to be implemented differently in each EU state. Recipe for bureaucratic chaos, and de-facto a mandatory imposition on service providers to comply with the strictest one [2].

I am thinking mostly about code share. But the same I could really say about the art side of things. I do believe that all creative endeavours (science, engineering, art) are actually quite blurred together, but that’s another story.

Now, the EU parliament is split in half, and one or two MEPs could be enough to have Article 13 rejected at the vote that will be on the 20 June 2018. If you too feel like this norm is broken, do not hesitate to take action and send your concern directly to your MEPs. EU has a chance be the democracy we need only if we do actually use our voice.



[CrocoDuck] [1]https://juliareda.eu/eu-copyright-reform/censorship-machines/
[2]https://juliareda.eu/2018/05/censorship-machines-link-tax-finish-line/
[3]https://blog.github.com/2018-04-30-eu-upload-filters-response/
[4]https://github.com/git-federation/gitpub
[5]https://savecodeshare.eu/static/assets/WhitePaper-ImpactofArticel13onSoftwareEcosystem-SaveCodeShare.pdf

This is really urgent. It is said that the European Parliament will vote on it on June 20 or 21, and they are the one institution that can still stop this legislation.

You can take action here by contacting members of parliament:

https://saveyourinternet.eu/

https://www.fixcopyright.eu/

https://changecopyright.org/en-US/

and/or by signing an open letter:

https://savecodeshare.eu/

Or directly email your MEPs: http://www.europarl.europa.eu/meps/en/search.html?country=GB


If you have a Twitter account, the site https://www.fixcopyright.eu/ makes it easy to tweet the key people on the committee.
For more info on the EU copyright review itself and resharing it around you can check out the following D* posts:
Copyright reform: can Federation’s greatest strength turn out to be its biggest weakness?
The EU Copyright Reform Again…
EU creating a link tax this month
EU creating a link tax law and forcing an upload filter law this month
Copyright reform: EU states agree on upload filters and ancillary copyright law
Forget GDPR, EU’s New Copyright Proposal Will Be a Disaster for the Internet
Please Save Code Share!
#FOSS, #reform, #politics, #politik, #creativecommons, #cc, #legislation, #europa, #freedom, #freedom-of-speech, #fairuse, #fair-use, #link, #link-tax, #linktax, #freeweb, #free-web, #sharing, #uploading, #uploads, #version-control, #EU, #EU-copyright, #law, #copyright, #censorship, #savecodeshare, #open-source, #software, #software-development, #social, #Europe, #diaspora, #thefederation, #federation, #the-federation, #internet, #web, #european-union, #europeanunion, #email, #irc, #laws, #law, #DeleteArt13, #xmpp, #jabber, #tax, #taxes
Censorship machines (Article 13)